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Old May 31st, 2011, 11:15 PM   #1
Moldbuster
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Safety Gear. What You Need...

3 Decades, that is how long I have been riding two wheel forms of transportation. Enough to have gone down more than once. Enough to have serious injuries, to see others with serious injuries...and yes, long enough to see people I know die. Long enough to know that safety gear isn't a nice thing to have..it is an absolute necessity. Something which you need to budget for when you purchase your first motorcycle. The question is, WHAT gear to get? This is a question that is asked on forums with beginning riders time and time again. The quantity of equipment out there is staggering and confusing So, here is a little guide which hopefully will help the newbies...

Why do you need safety gear? Riding a Motorcycle involves a degree of risk. The purpose of safety equipment is to minimize some of the risk. When you fall off a bike, the forces involved are very high and those forces can cause injury.

What Causes Injuries?

There are two things that you are going to experience in a crash which are likely to cause injury...

1) Impact. Impact from your body hitting the pavement whether it be a small distance as in a slow low side crash, or impact from up high as in a high side crash or an trip over the hood of a car. There is impact from other objects...your bike, an SUV with somebody on the cell, animals or static objects like curbs. If a cyclist tumbles during a crash, this is likely to cause impact injuries. Typically, impacts are going to break things...usually bones.

2) Friction. Friction from parts of your body skimming slong the pavement. Friction typically causes two types of injuries...

1) Road Rash. Road Rash is caused by pavement directly contacting your skin at speed and ablating (wearing away) layers of it. The higher the speed, the more layers which are removed. Serious Road Rash is life threatening or disfiguring. The treatment is identical to burn treatment. Take a drill, put a wire wheel on it, turn it on high...apply to a bare portion of skin, rub dirt in the wound...that is the equivalent of a medium speed road rash.

2) Burns. Friction causes heat. The heat can be great enough to cause severe burns under your clothing. It can be enough to melt things. See the note on coated fabric at the end.

What Proper Gear Must Do.

Proper Gear must protect the body from impact. This is done thru padding the material or added layers, and thru armor. Armor is additional impact protection added to safety gear to protect the most vulnerable and commonly damaged parts of the body in a crash. This includes the head, shoulders, scapula, elbows, hands, knees, hips, thighs, spine/back and chest. The amount of impact armor varies. The better the equipment is, the more impact coverage it has. Impact armor also comes wearable. It is strapped to the body. Very common to see knee armor worn under jeans (see Jeans).

Proper Gear must protect from friction and heat. The degree of friction resistance varies tremendously. See individual notes on fabric types.

The Gear
So...what gear do you need and what are the differences? Lets take them one by one.

HELMET. If you need to ask why you need to wear a helmet to ride a motorcycle, stop reading now. Call your insurance agent and buy a catastrophic coverage policy and a large life policy. At least take care of your loved ones. People have died from simple tip overs, stopped...in parkimg lots. Nuff said. You want a FULL FACE HELMET. Why? Because far and away statistically the most common impact point on a helmet in a crash is the front lower jaw. Your helmet should fit you properly. There are many guides on helmet fitment. If you are unsure, ask for help. It is best to try helmets on. Everybody has a different shape head. Get a recognized brand and ALWAYS BUY A NEW HELMET!

GLOVES. Hand Injuries SUCK. And unfortunately, instinct causes a majority of hand injuries. Why instinct? If you fall, what is your reaction? You Put your hand down. Onto pavement. Moving at 70 mph. You need gloves. Gloves vary wildly in design and cost. Expensive gloves offer several things you won't get in a cheap glove. Stronger stitching, if your hand hits the pavement and a seam blows open from the force, you got hamburger. Better gloves now employ slippery materials in the palm. You fall, put your hand down, the glove slides, taking the stress off the stitching and preventing arm and hand fractures from sudden decelleration if the leather catches. At a minimum, you want gloves with reinforced palms and knuckle and finger armor. Full length, or Gauntlet gloves are unquestionably better. The extra length allows for additional securing of the glove to your hand, helping preventing the glove from being torn off in an ass backwards slide and securing the sleeves in place.

BOOTS. Aside from head and hand injuries, foot injuries are the most debilitating. Why? Because feet are incredibly complicated and have the least bloodflow. Foot injuries are very common. Why? Because the most common form of crash is the low side crash and it is very common for the feet to be trapped under the bike as it skids along the pavement. Also, your feet are in a vulnerable place on the bike. Good full length riding boots are an absolute must. Notice I said FULL LENGTH boots. There is a disturbing trend among sportbike riders...the "Street Shoe" this is essentially an armored shoe or short boot. Why is this a bad idea? Crashes often involve feet impacting with objects. The bike, the curb, the cage that didn't see you. When those impacts happen, two things often occur. First, the object will often catch the boot/shoe and try to tear it off. Second, the impact will cause the foot to be twisted in unnatural ways. A short shoe or boot does not have enough surface area to resist being torn off and it does not have the height or holding power to prevent from being torn off . It does not have enough height to provide for enough structure to deliver ankle stability. The result is a drastic increase in the chances of a debilitating foot injury. Full length motorcycle specific boots stabilize the foot ankle and heel. The extra height and additional fasteners keeps the boot secured to the foot. They also provide one other degree of protection. Remember the foot trapped under the bike thing? What else is under the bike? How about a sizzling hot exhaust? If your shin is trapped, that extra long boot will help prevent you from hearing the sound of sizzling until you can get your leg out. The best boots are race boots. They are armor for your feet with multiple systems to protect the foot, heel, ankle and shin. They are nearly impossible to get off in a collision and more than one rider has kept their leg after being side swiped by a car wearing top notch race boots.

JACKET AND PANTS. Your Jacket amd Pants protect the majority of your body from impact and friction. You will note I put down Jacket AND Pants. Why? Because all too many riders buy a jacket and then wear jeans. This is a very bad idea.

JEANS...NO! Denim Jeans are perhaps the most commonly worn pant on a motorcycle. They are also utterly useless as protective equipment. Denim has a tear resistance of 4.5 lbs. Compare this to good leather at 80-110 lbs and Air Mesh Kevlar fabric at 1250 lbs. The abrasion and heat resistance of cotton denim is nearly non existant. This means if you go down in them, they are likely to rip open and if you are lucky enough to not have them tear, the friction is likely to burn the fabric into your skin. A special mention must go to "Kevlar Jeans". In this version, the jeans are lined with Kevlar. However...there is a problem. The jeans are the same cotton denim as regular jeans so ther is no additional tear resistance. Even if the denim is doubled up, it is pretty weak. They fail often. The kevlar is loosely sown in and it adds no strength. Why? Because Kevlar, in order to be strong, must be woven in with other fabrics. Pure Kevlar doesn't have much strength. It does have good insulating properties. In addition jeans have no armor protection for impact.

PROPER PANTS AND JACKET. You want pants and a jacket designed for motorcycle riding. Designed to handle friction, heat and impact. The choice of material is what determines how well the article will work, how long it will last and whether it will survive after a crash. Here are the most common materials...

MESH. Used in warm weather gear, mesh is cool and flows a lot of air. Unfortunately, most mesh gear is so so when it comes to protection and it is usually a 1 crash only item. It offers poor friction burn protection. The exception to the rule is Air Mesh Kevlar made by a company called Motoport. It is the strongest motorcycle fabric available, has exceptionak heat reistance and comes with a lifetime crash warranty. It is, as you would expect, more expensive.

Textile. Textile Is typically 500 Denier Polyester, Ballistic Nylon, or 500 Denier Cordura. A compromise between mesh and leather or Kevlar, it offers decent protection at low to medium cost. Most textile gear is about 1/2 the strength and abrasion resistance of full leather. There is an exception...1000 Denier Cordura has the same strength and abrasion resistance as full competition leather at a significant price discount. The only company I know of making full pants, jacket and suits from it is Motoport. If others do, please post.

Leather. Leather has been the gold standard for decades. For good reason. It is strong, abrasion resistant, heat resistant and will often hold up for multiple crashes. It does have its' drawbacks however. Leather is warm, hot to be precise. You can get perforated leather which helps. Leather is a natural material and the quality of the material varies. Good leather is expensive and it has a limited lifespan. It weakens with age and sweat. It can be spendy. Plan on spending from $800-$3000 for a leather track suit. It is heavy. You want thick but thick means weight. Some manufacturers get around this by using alternate animal hides. Kangaroo turns out to be the best, but a full Roo suit will run $1500 or more. For the average rider on the street, halfway decent leathers can be had for $500.

Kevlar blended fabrics. These are rare. The company known for them is a small California company called Motoport. Kevlar blended fabrics offer a good blend of airflow, light weight, and extreme crashworthiness. The gear runs moderately expensive, about $1000 for 1 or 2 piece suit. It will last decades.

SUIT. eventually, as a rider, you will get a suit. What kind of suit will depend on the type of riding you do....

1 piece. Hardcore street, track day and racing. Tightly fitted, a pain to get on and off but the best protection.

2 Piece. Jacket and pants zip together. Good for general riding, sport riding, and track days.

Oversuit. For the commuter or touring person. Goes on over your street clothes. Okay for sport riding, not usually track approved. Examples include the Aerostitch and the Motoport Ultra Trek.

A CAUTIONARY NOTE ON COATED TEXTILES
Some textiles use a polypropylene coating on the fabric. Avoid this. If you go down, the friction can melt the polypropylene into your skin requiring skin grafts.
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Old May 31st, 2011, 11:56 PM   #2
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Wow great post! Every person whos new to riding should read this! Although I'm not too sure how much I agree (and I know I'll hear responses to this but its just my opinion) about the jean kevlar pants not holding up. I've seen some videos on youtube where people were glad they had these on. :-\ IMO its better then regular jeans. But, people should consider better pants. Great post! Well informative.
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Old June 1st, 2011, 12:02 AM   #3
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no cliffnotes?

that's alot of reading material
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Old June 1st, 2011, 12:14 AM   #4
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Fantastic post and definitely a recommended read for new riders looking at what kind of gear to get.

One thing you never mentioned and I can understand why since the post is about maximum protection and what you can do to accomplish it is, the practicality of all that gear. I agree with the fact that it is necessary but it also comes with a level of hassle and I'd like to make an addendum that the best gear is gear you're SURE to wear everytime. If that means jeans then atleast make it the thickest jeans possible with as much kevlar lining as possible and preferably armored shorts and knee guards. Just an example. If that means a non-race boot but a touring boot then better than a short boot. There's just no such thing as ultimate gear for everybody.

In anycase, great post. Looking forward to what all the other veterans have to add to it.
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Old June 1st, 2011, 04:21 AM   #5
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Great post, thanks! I'd add that hearing protection should be considered a mandatory gear item. There is an outstanding thread in this section of the forums entitled "Do You Wear Ear Protection" that goes through all the reasons that need not be repeated here.

And while I too love Motoport gear, it is not the only way to get safe cordura, mesh or kevlar gear. Great that you are loyal, but there are many other manufacturers who make outstanding gear that will protect a rider in the event of a crash. Aerostich has a great, proven track record protecting riders in crashes. Teiz Motosports puts out fantastic quality gear, including a mesh one-piece with 1680D protection in the key bits and dynex mesh. Dianese and REV'IT put out amazing quality stuff, including gear with woven ceramic that protects better than leather. All put out stuff, including high end mesh products, that will protect you well in a getoff. As to whether they would do as well as Motoport gear, I'm not saying - just that there are many good options. And many good options that are more economical than Motoport, which is some of the most expensive gear around.

Again, I happen to think Motoport is great stuff. But it is worth noting there is a devoted anti-Motoport group out there that offers some balance to those who love Motoport. There are complaints about Wayne (the owner) and his customer service - problems with fitment, overcharging for options that didn't deliver, etc. There are also repeated complaints that Motoport oversells its product and what it can deliver. Among claims I've seen is that Motoport is cooler than any other suit - not true (though I do think it offers the best blend of cooling and protection); that it dries in minutes after a rainfall - simply not true, though it does fine; that you'll be more comfortable in Motoport at 100 degrees than if you just wear a tshirt and shorts - not true (and ridiculous, it vents well, but it still is adding a layer and does not have magical properties); and importantly that Motoport air mesh has better abrasion resistance than leather - not true by independent testing. You have to be careful of swallowing what Motoport is saying or trusting its marketing or testing completely -- they oversell their stuff when they don't really need to, and that makes me wonder about them a bit. Here are the results of the independent test:

Tear and Abrasion Strength by the numbers:Pounds of force until fabric tears Abrasion cycles on pavement until fabric fails

CottonJeans 4.5 pounds to tear 50 cycles to failure
70 Denier Standard Nylon 4.5 pounds to tear 165 cycles to failure
500 Denier Polyester 8 pounds to tear 180 cycles to failure
200 Denier Standard Nylon 7.5 pounds to tear 275 cycles to failure
500 Denier Cordura 22 pounds to tear 710 cycles to failure
620 Denier Cordura 35 pounds to tear 1200 cycles to failure
Motorcycle Leather 80-110 pounds to tear 1200-1700 cycles to failure
1000 Denier Cordura 110 pounds to tear 1780 cycles to failure
Air Mesh Kevlar 1260 pounds to tear 970 cycles to failure *** EDIT: Notice that airmesh is less abrasion resistant than stretch or leather, this comes as a big surprise to many that believe that air mesh is superior ***
Stretch Kevlar Blend 420lbs pounds to tear 1800 cycles to failure
Leather, Competition Weight, (no tear weight available) 3 oz./sq. ft. 2600 cycles to failure

Not saying I buy into the anti-Motoport crowd, and actually do think that Motoport is among the best, if not the best, protective gear out there. Just noting that there are some chinks in the armor, as it were, and suggesting that members keep an open mind about other options. It may be worth reading this thread ADV Rider Motoport thread for balance, as it contains both devotees and anti-motorport opinions.
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Old June 1st, 2011, 07:19 AM   #6
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Great post, thanks! I'd add that hearing protection should be considered a mandatory gear item. There is an outstanding thread in this section of the forums entitled "Do You Wear Ear Protection" that goes through all the reasons that need not be repeated here.

And while I too love Motoport gear, it is not the only way to get safe cordura, mesh or kevlar gear. Great that you are loyal, but there are many other manufacturers who make outstanding gear that will protect a rider in the event of a crash. Aerostich has a great, proven track record protecting riders in crashes. Teiz Motosports puts out fantastic quality gear, including a mesh one-piece with 1680D protection in the key bits and dynex mesh. Dianese and REV'IT put out amazing quality stuff, including gear with woven ceramic that protects better than leather. All put out stuff, including high end mesh products, that will protect you well in a getoff. As to whether they would do as well as Motoport gear, I'm not saying - just that there are many good options. And many good options that are more economical than Motoport, which is some of the most expensive gear around.

Again, I happen to think Motoport is great stuff. But it is worth noting there is a devoted anti-Motoport group out there that offers some balance to those who love Motoport. There are complaints about Wayne (the owner) and his customer service - problems with fitment, overcharging for options that didn't deliver, etc. There are also repeated complaints that Motoport oversells its product and what it can deliver. Among claims I've seen is that Motoport is cooler than any other suit - not true (though I do think it offers the best blend of cooling and protection); that it dries in minutes after a rainfall - simply not true, though it does fine; that you'll be more comfortable in Motoport at 100 degrees than if you just wear a tshirt and shorts - not true (and ridiculous, it vents well, but it still is adding a layer and does not have magical properties); and importantly that Motoport air mesh has better abrasion resistance than leather - not true by independent testing. You have to be careful of swallowing what Motoport is saying or trusting its marketing or testing completely -- they oversell their stuff when they don't really need to, and that makes me wonder about them a bit. Here are the results of the independent test:

Tear and Abrasion Strength by the numbers:Pounds of force until fabric tears Abrasion cycles on pavement until fabric fails

CottonJeans 4.5 pounds to tear 50 cycles to failure
70 Denier Standard Nylon 4.5 pounds to tear 165 cycles to failure
500 Denier Polyester 8 pounds to tear 180 cycles to failure
200 Denier Standard Nylon 7.5 pounds to tear 275 cycles to failure
500 Denier Cordura 22 pounds to tear 710 cycles to failure
620 Denier Cordura 35 pounds to tear 1200 cycles to failure
Motorcycle Leather 80-110 pounds to tear 1200-1700 cycles to failure
1000 Denier Cordura 110 pounds to tear 1780 cycles to failure
Air Mesh Kevlar 1260 pounds to tear 970 cycles to failure *** EDIT: Notice that airmesh is less abrasion resistant than stretch or leather, this comes as a big surprise to many that believe that air mesh is superior ***
Stretch Kevlar Blend 420lbs pounds to tear 1800 cycles to failure
Leather, Competition Weight, (no tear weight available) 3 oz./sq. ft. 2600 cycles to failure

Not saying I buy into the anti-Motoport crowd, and actually do think that Motoport is among the best, if not the best, protective gear out there. Just noting that there are some chinks in the armor, as it were, and suggesting that members keep an open mind about other options. It may be worth reading this thread ADV Rider Motoport thread for balance, as it contains both devotees and anti-motorport opinions.
There is no piece of gear which will protect you in the every possible circumstance. However, in relative terms, I'll take the Kevlar. The Air mesh has lower abrasion resistance than stretch or leather...but compared to regular mesh, it is worlds better. I would point out that Motoport has that chart on their website. I wear stretch kevlar. Over 30 years, I've had mesh, textile, comp leather, an Aerostitch suit (bloody hot!) and the Motoport gear. Crashed in all of them. Leather and Kevlar definitely are my two top picks. The other thing to point out is that while other manufacturers make gear with materials that are even more resistant, they use those materials in only limited areas of the garment. The Motoport gear is 100%. Finally, there is the guarantee. 7 year warranty, lifetime failure replacement guarantee. It is spendy.
As to the drying in minutes after a rainstorm...did you see where I live? This I can confirm.., at least on the stretch Kevlar. Cooler than any other suit...compared to my A*s race leathers, the GP-1 is light years cooler

Would I recommend the Teiz gear? Yup. Looks like good stuff. Dianese and Rev-It? Dianese yes, Rev-It...selected gear. Do your research and choose what works best you you but get the best you possibly can.

Every person needs to make a judgement for themselves as to to the relative merits of each choice. As I pointed out, the Motoport Kevlar gear is expensive, though the Cordura gear is good deal. That is its' drawback. Leather is great, but has flaws in weight, heat and longevity. Textile has come a hugely long way. Mesh...um...getting better. Jeans...no freaking way. Get the best you can and budget accordingly.
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Old June 1st, 2011, 07:28 AM   #7
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Fantastic post and definitely a recommended read for new riders looking at what kind of gear to get.

One thing you never mentioned and I can understand why since the post is about maximum protection and what you can do to accomplish it is, the practicality of all that gear. I agree with the fact that it is necessary but it also comes with a level of hassle and I'd like to make an addendum that the best gear is gear you're SURE to wear everytime. If that means jeans then atleast make it the thickest jeans possible with as much kevlar lining as possible and preferably armored shorts and knee guards. Just an example. If that means a non-race boot but a touring boot then better than a short boot. There's just no such thing as ultimate gear for everybody.

In anycase, great post. Looking forward to what all the other veterans have to add to it.
Pracicality does play into things. Buy you need to balance the hassle of gear versus the hassle of injury. When you do, gear wins every time. Instead oj jeans, get an oversuit. They take minutes to put on and take off. Usually the ones who choose gear to the highly practical side are the ones who have never had a serious pavement sample. Your mind changes quickly after that happens. Motorcycles are not practical vehicles!
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Old June 1st, 2011, 07:46 AM   #8
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Wow great post! Every person whos new to riding should read this! Although I'm not too sure how much I agree (and I know I'll hear responses to this but its just my opinion) about the jean kevlar pants not holding up. I've seen some videos on youtube where people were glad they had these on. :-\ IMO its better then regular jeans. But, people should consider better pants. Great post! Well informative.
They were lucky and most likely hit at low speeds with only a sliding component to the crash, I.E. A low side at 35 mph. A tumbling impact at highway speeds, you are likely in for some serious pain. I know of many failures and they were all tear failures. If the inner liner was a kevlar blended material that covered the whole thing... I'd change my mind, but that would be spendy and lets be honest, they are built for cost. Unfortunately, they are marketed as protective gear and they really aren't. Denim simply isn't strong enough to resist high G impact stresses, you can't change material science. Are jeans better than the shorts often seen being sported by squiddus sportcyclus? Yes. Are Kevlar jeans better than regular jeans? Yup. Better than mesh? Nope. Look into cordura pants if you want to wear pants and not look like an 80's rock star at work. An oversuit is another good option.
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Old June 1st, 2011, 08:54 AM   #9
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We are completely on the same page on the big picture, and with purpose of this thread to encourage people to wear ATGATT, and not to skimp on protection. Thanks again for putting the focus on this issue and continuing your signature pledge to get people geared up.
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Old June 1st, 2011, 01:52 PM   #10
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So, flip flops are out?
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Old June 1st, 2011, 06:48 PM   #11
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So, flip flops are out?
It is easier just to take a chain saw to your feet.
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Old June 1st, 2011, 06:53 PM   #12
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We completely on the same page on the big picture, and with purpose of this thread to encourage people to wear ATGATT, and not to skimp on protection. Thanks again for putting the focus on this issue and continuing your signature pledge to get people geared up.
The frustration in seeing guys get needlessly hurt drives me. It gives sportbike riders another check mark against them in the public eye. You should see the battles I wage on SBN to get beginning riders to NOT buy a SS or a 650 as their first bike and to convince people that...yeah, the 250R really IS fun and not a "throw away cheap beginner bike".
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Old June 1st, 2011, 06:58 PM   #13
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This makes me feel even worse about wearing my jeans when I ride. I need to buy some nice riding pants, I feel like I look like a loser in jeans anyway .
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Old June 2nd, 2011, 04:36 AM   #14
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Are these not good enough gloves moldster :O?

http://www.revzilla.com/product/icon...original-glove
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Old June 2nd, 2011, 09:10 AM   #15
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From one ATGATT poster child to another - Great post Kevin.

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Old June 2nd, 2011, 09:44 AM   #16
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Are these not good enough gloves moldster :O?

http://www.revzilla.com/product/icon...original-glove
You want the long version. Put on a short pair of gloves then try to pull them off your hands. Now try the same thing with a long pair. Big difference. Most people are surprised by how much extra support and strength that gauntlet adds.

Here you go...
http://www.revzilla.com/product/icon...rx-long-gloves

Also...at some point, try a set of premium gloves like Helds or Knox Handroids. The difference in the feel and control you get on the bike is significant. It really isn't subtle.
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Safety Tzar. You WILL wear PROPER gear...and you will LIKE IT!
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Old June 2nd, 2011, 09:55 AM   #17
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JeffM...



Eventually most every rider will understand. The only variation will be the level of pain experienced during the recognition process.
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Old June 2nd, 2011, 12:41 PM   #18
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Old June 2nd, 2011, 01:11 PM   #19
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Old June 2nd, 2011, 06:56 PM   #20
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Thanks! My hope is that it will help new riders make a very important decision. If Just one injury is prevented, the Tzar will be happy.
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Old June 15th, 2014, 11:00 PM   #21
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OK guys i havent seen this mentioned, what about carhartt work pants?? or even some dickies? i think they'd be better than jeans no?
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Old June 16th, 2014, 07:56 AM   #22
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OK guys i havent seen this mentioned, what about carhartt work pants?? or even some dickies? i think they'd be better than jeans no?
One of the major motorcycle magazines (Cycle World, I think) did a test back in the mid-90s. This was only to test the abrasion resistance of common materials.

They took a ~20 lb bag of chalk powder (like you can get to make the lines at a baseball field), put it in an egg crate with the test material covering it (tied or stitched on to secure it. They used a colored chalk (red, I think) and colored the outside of the test material.

Then they attached it to the back of a pickup on a pivot so they could gently lower it onto the pavement from the back of the truck while it was moving.

The point where the contact started was red, from the chalk on the outside. Then, when it wore through the material, the white chalk on the inside would show.

The results were surprising (to me, at least). Basic denim jeans lasted about....2-3 feet. The 'heavy duty' jeans last a couple of feet more. The textile last somewhere around 20-25 feet, I think. But nothing came close to the leather.

Now, realize that impact would change this, and some materials have really improved since then, but I wouldn't count on even heavy duty jeans doing any good. Plus they have zero padding, so won't do anything for impact. Even if you don't get roadrash, a shattered kneecap sucks.

If you want to wear jeans, I would highly (HIGHLY) recommend at least getting some comfortable underarmor like http://www.bohnarmor.com/
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Old June 16th, 2014, 08:03 AM   #23
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Old June 16th, 2014, 09:46 AM   #24
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I ment like the Thick canvas type of carhartt work pants.. those fuggin things are THICK and heavy duty. Just wondering.
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Old June 16th, 2014, 03:24 PM   #25
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I ment like the Thick canvas type of carhartt work pants.. those fuggin things are THICK and heavy duty. Just wondering.
I have crashed in them low side slid about 10 feet and still had one layer.
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Old June 16th, 2014, 03:31 PM   #26
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op mentions "good leather at 80-110 lbs and Air Mesh Kevlar fabric at 1250 lbs."

... no.


i wear skateboarding jeans rated around 200d. one pair in particular has seen two crashed (one car impact) and i still wear them. theres a thread sticking out where they were dragged on the asphalt about 20 feet.
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