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Old August 21st, 2017, 06:54 AM   #1
adouglas
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A take on highsides I'd not heard before

Heard at the track this past weekend:

"A highside is just a lowside where you chop the throttle."

Discuss.

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Old August 21st, 2017, 08:22 AM   #2
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A highside is where the tire loses grip, comes out of line from the other tire and then regains grip

chopping the throttle while the rear is out of line due to excess throttle causing wheel spin makes this significantly more likely to happen but it's not the only way to do it. Any number of factors could cause the rear (or front) to lose grip then re-grip. These factors are more often found on the streets than on a track. Sand, gravel, oil, along with water in sealant patches are examples of ways a tire could step out that doesn't involve the rear tire breaking free from excess throttle.

That said, chopping the throttle rarely ends well
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Old August 21st, 2017, 10:49 AM   #3
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Too much rear braking when you entre turn can cause high-side.

Too much rear braking in middle of turn can cause high-side (this is actually what chopping throttle does)

Hitting dirt, sand, oil in middle of turn with rear tyre can cause high-side.

Too sticky front tyre with not sticky enough rear tyre can cause high-side

Too high or too low-pressure in rear tyre can cause high-side

Bad weight distribution, too much or too little weight over rear tyre can cause high-side

Too much compression or rebound-damping on rear can cause high-side

Coolant or oil dropping onto rear tyre can cause high-side.
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Old August 21st, 2017, 11:05 AM   #4
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Yeah, the thing I found interesting was not what causes the loss of traction in the first place. That much is obvious, as is the concept of suddenly regaining traction.

What I found intriguing is the thought that the two things are the same, but with one added factor in the case of the highside. Not intrinsically different from one another. Keep the tire spinning and it becomes a simple lowside rather than an attempt to channel your inner Superman. Or, ideally, ride it out and recover.
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Old August 21st, 2017, 03:43 PM   #5
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ive had 3 lowsides on the track, they seam to happen really fast, almost with out warning, either I ignored the warnings or was ignorant of them, im not sure. but i do remember one second I had a smile, the next, a shoulder full of tarmac.
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Old August 21st, 2017, 05:15 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by jrshooter View Post
ive had 3 lowsides on the track, they seam to happen really fast, almost with out warning, either I ignored the warnings or was ignorant of them, im not sure. but i do remember one second I had a smile, the next, a shoulder full of tarmac.
Ouch!!! I've done that!!!
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Old August 21st, 2017, 05:22 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by adouglas View Post
What I found intriguing is the thought that the two things are the same, but with one added factor in the case of the highside. Not intrinsically different from one another. Keep the tire spinning and it becomes a simple lowside rather than an attempt to channel your inner Superman. Or, ideally, ride it out and recover.
I wonder about physics of converting rear-end powerslide into low-side. If front end has more traction than rear at beginning, how does it lose traction if you keep throttle on? Is it because you're increasing speed and eventually overcome traction-limit of front tyre at same lean-angle? If you increase speed, you also have to add lean-angle to stay on same curve. And that can cause low-side?

Standing up bike will add traction to both front & rear tyres. Then you risk running off road!
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Old August 21st, 2017, 06:24 PM   #8
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Ouch!!! I've done that!!!
i hope you will be in tip top shape for the 9th 10th
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Old August 22nd, 2017, 04:53 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by JacRyann View Post
I wonder about physics of converting rear-end powerslide into low-side. If front end has more traction than rear at beginning, how does it lose traction if you keep throttle on? Is it because you're increasing speed and eventually overcome traction-limit of front tyre at same lean-angle? If you increase speed, you also have to add lean-angle to stay on same curve. And that can cause low-side?

Standing up bike will add traction to both front & rear tyres. Then you risk running off road!
I don't see it like that. The front does not have to lose traction in order to have a lowside crash.

Consider the classic "I had to lay it down" lowside... the back end comes around while the front is still pointed in the direction of travel, and the front still has traction. The bike leans more and more until hard parts hit and the rear comes off the ground.

If the rider stays in it as the bike goes down, the rear never regains traction, right? But if the rider chops the throttle, the rear might hook up and there's your highside.

Flat trackers do this intentionally. The rear tire is spinning like crazy, the bike is sideways, but the front is still hooked up. Easy to see how going too far with that could lead to a low side.

(google, google...) Ah, here it is in action. Rider is spinning the rear here, classic flat-track style.


Link to original page on YouTube.

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Old August 22nd, 2017, 05:50 AM   #10
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High side is when you fly over the bike, can come from various issues of traction and throttle control.
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Old August 22nd, 2017, 06:12 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by adouglas View Post
I don't see it like that. The front does not have to lose traction in order to have a lowside crash.

Consider the classic "I had to lay it down" lowside... the back end comes around while the front is still pointed in the direction of travel, and the front still has traction. The bike leans more and more until hard parts hit and the rear comes off the ground.

If the rider stays in it as the bike goes down, the rear never regains traction, right? But if the rider chops the throttle, the rear might hook up and there's your highside.

Flat trackers do this intentionally. The rear tire is spinning like crazy, the bike is sideways, but the front is still hooked up. Easy to see how going too far with that could lead to a low side.

(google, google...) Ah, here it is in action. Rider is spinning the rear here, classic flat-track style.


Link to original page on YouTube.

thanks, that's really helpful info. I guess I never seem to get back-end around with power. Back tyre just grips, speeds up bike and tucks front-end. I guess that's what i get for running stock front tyre size while increasing rear two sizes up.

I'll try bringing it into better balance with stickier compound in front, or maybe even a 120/70 front.
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Old August 22nd, 2017, 06:33 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JacRyann View Post
thanks, that's really helpful info. I guess I never seem to get back-end around with power. Back tyre just grips, speeds up bike and tucks front-end. I guess that's what i get for running stock front tyre size while increasing rear two sizes up.

I'll try bringing it into better balance with stickier compound in front, or maybe even a 120/70 front.
jack before you run off in one direction. think of this, not saying its your case.
one of my low sides, i was ready to change out tires, has to be the problem.
fortunate enough to find the track camera man caught a photo, rite before.

my body pos was screwed up, i had serious lean on the bike and i needed more.
so i went further and lost it. the photo showed serious lean but a body position that belonged in a motox picture. my son was next to me in the pict and at the same speed with half the lean,
just something to consider,
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Old August 22nd, 2017, 08:56 PM   #13
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Ah, good idea, thanks! I'll see if Dito has some photos.

I've slid and tucked front-end many times, and can catch it if I approach that limit gradually and smoothly. Oh, I know I messed up this time by giving it too much throttle too suddenly in corner (lack of patience, ADD squirrel!).

In addition to improving my technique, I also want to adjust bike's behavior at and over limit. So that consequences of mistakes aren't so dire. Kinda like juggling F/R swaybar stiffnesses on autos. Many people use softer Pirelli SC1 compound in front and harder SC2 in rear.

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Old August 23rd, 2017, 05:52 AM   #14
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thanks, that's really helpful info. I guess I never seem to get back-end around with power. Back tyre just grips, speeds up bike and tucks front-end. I guess that's what i get for running stock front tyre size while increasing rear two sizes up.

I'll try bringing it into better balance with stickier compound in front, or maybe even a 120/70 front.
if you are on the 250, one thing to consider about going faster is that there is more rotating mass on bigger tires, the fastest guys at Chuckwalla are running a 120 rear and 95 front.

by the way do you ever make it to Chuckwalla?
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Old August 23rd, 2017, 07:45 AM   #15
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if you are on the 250, one thing to consider about going faster is that there is more rotating mass on bigger tires, the fastest guys at Chuckwalla are running a 120 rear and 95 front.

by the way do you ever make it to Chuckwalla?
Interesting... that's a more balanced front/rear size combo. I'll check those out! thx.

Not yet, haven't visited Chandler in-laws in while. Maybe on way to Thanksgiving? I also want to visit one of my favourite SoCal tracks, Streets of Willow Springs. Never done that on a bike either.

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Old August 23rd, 2017, 03:06 PM   #16
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Interesting... that's a more balanced front/rear size combo. I'll check those out! thx.

Not yet, haven't visited Chandler in-laws in while. Maybe on way to Thanksgiving? I also want to visit one of my favourite SoCal tracks, Streets of Willow Springs. Never done that on a bike either.
there running the same at afm
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Old August 23rd, 2017, 10:16 PM   #17
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Quote:
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if you are on the 250, one thing to consider about going faster is that there is more rotating mass on bigger tires, the fastest guys at Chuckwalla are running a 120 rear and 95 front.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrshooter View Post
there running the same at afm
Are these tyres you're talking about?
http://viets-performance.com/Tires/B...125cc-Slicks_3
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Old August 24th, 2017, 05:51 AM   #18
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Are these tyres you're talking about?
http://viets-performance.com/Tires/B...125cc-Slicks_3
yes that is also who my tire guy works for.
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Old September 13th, 2017, 01:24 PM   #19
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Here is some info that may contribute to this thread. From A Twist of the Wrist II, Keith Code explains:

“in most typical of slides, you have the back end “coming around.” What isn’t understood by most riders is the fact that the bike actually compensates for this slide automatically. In a rear end slide the front end turns toward the direction the bike is actually going – into the slide.

The main mass of the bike is moving outward and the front wheel turns just the right amount to stabilize it. This feature comes free of charge with every motorcycle. In a car, if the back end comes around, the front wheels turn to the inside of the turn, creating a pivot point for the car’s mass, and it spins out. Learning how to drive a car in the snow is mostly a matter of understanding that you have to manually turn the wheel into the skid to stabilize it. You don’t on a bike.”

“When the bike slides, if the rider is successful at holding the bars tight enough that they don’t turn into the slide, the bike now acts like the car: The front contact patch becomes a pivot point except that a motorcycle doesn’t spin out, it highsides! More little slides have turned into far worse situations that you would care to know, because of this dramatic result of being too tight on the bars.”

So, chopping the gas can force the bike to high side but so too can gripping the bars too tightly or grabbing, releasing the brakes too quickly.

Discuss.
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Old September 13th, 2017, 01:37 PM   #20
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^ Sounds about right.

The less "evasive action" you take the better.

Ride it out smoothly and look where you want to go.
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Old September 13th, 2017, 04:50 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adouglas View Post
Heard at the track this past weekend:

"A highside is just a lowside where you chop the throttle."
Others got to this before I did as I totally forgot about this thread. As far as my 2cents, I really, really, really, really hate generic, catch all "advice" like this. I mean, it's ok as a joke and all. But I know some riders take this kinda stuff as gospel.

I lump this, along with many others in the column of "scare tactics." Much of which, do more harm than good.
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Old October 11th, 2017, 11:47 AM   #22
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This is why hitting a dirt track and playing sound with sliding and throttle control can be so beneficial (says me that just came back from 4 days at the Texas Tornado Bootcamp!) The little bikes make it super easy to feel what it's like when you slide and chop the throttle (yes I did toss myself over the bars a few times) and also what it's like when you slide the rear and manage to not chop the throttle (yes I saved myself from many more crashes by being able to modulate the throttle. Any practice you can get with Throttle control where you can experience sliding and such is helpful!

I remember when I first started racing, I had several high sides (thankfully I didn't get too hurt) but I had no idea what I was doing wrong. It wasn't until I went to the California Superbike School and Keith made me ride the slide bike did I understand first of all what I was doing wrong (chopping the throttle when the rear slid) and how to resolve it (learn how to avoid the survival reaction and keep the gas on or simply stop rolling on) that I stopped having such horrendous crashes. I clearly remember the first time I was able to avoid a high side after I rode the slide bike. I was coaching a fast student and got on the gas too hard out of turn 5 at laguna Seca and the rear stepped out and I was literally sideways. Instead of chopping the throttle I held it steady and controlled the slide, stood the bike up and kept going. It felt awesome to have overcome previous reactions!
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Old October 29th, 2017, 07:05 PM   #23
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Absolutely right Misti. I have a little 12" pit bike that I learned to ride on before I bought my ninja. After a year or so of riding street I went back to the pit bike (wore out my tires IIRC) for a week or two. When I got back on my jette, I somehow magically reached "the next level". I would attribute the skill gain to,
a) realizing that the bike just simply will NOT fall over when at speed
b) learned to ride the bike, not the bars-a pit bike is a 15hp bicycle basically, VERY sensitive to bar input.
c) and getting comfortable with the tires sliding all over the place from sand and gravel etc

I also somewhat recall breaking a really bad rookie habit of fixating on every little road discrepancy such as the 2" tar snake or the little pebble or leaf in the road.

awesome times, in fact, I think im gonna go fuel that little pit bike back up tomorrow and see what else she will teach me.
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Old March 29th, 2018, 02:32 PM   #24
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Absolutely right Misti. I have a little 12" pit bike that I learned to ride on before I bought my ninja. After a year or so of riding street I went back to the pit bike (wore out my tires IIRC) for a week or two. When I got back on my jette, I somehow magically reached "the next level". I would attribute the skill gain to,
a) realizing that the bike just simply will NOT fall over when at speed
b) learned to ride the bike, not the bars-a pit bike is a 15hp bicycle basically, VERY sensitive to bar input.
c) and getting comfortable with the tires sliding all over the place from sand and gravel etc

I also somewhat recall breaking a really bad rookie habit of fixating on every little road discrepancy such as the 2" tar snake or the little pebble or leaf in the road.

awesome times, in fact, I think im gonna go fuel that little pit bike back up tomorrow and see what else she will teach me.
That's funny you say this, I as well feel gained a new perspective on traction and feeling the acceptable amount of loss within the bike via pit bikes. Do 10 laps in dirt on a pitbike then hit the street. Suddenly your ass end sliding around a bit doesn't bother you it becomes a method of control. When you get the bike into a slide there's a choice, stay on it and let that wheel roast or pray to whatever god it doesn't catch sideways and catapult you. Which without doubt it will do to you on a pit bike. it just subconsciously trained me to do the opposite of what terror dictates and that's stiffen up lock your line of sight and let off the throttle (sometimes going for breaks) pushing your intertia forward completely damning you to a future of immediate pain.

Quote:
Originally Posted by adouglas View Post
Heard at the track this past weekend:

"A highside is just a lowside where you chop the throttle."

Discuss.

@csmith12 @Misti @Sirref



As far as a high side being a low side where you chopped the throttle I agree in some instances yeah totally. Other times its just that your mid corner in the apex you hit some left over bits of whatever rubber maybe glazzing and even if your trigger fingers don't twitch there's no saving you. Coming in way to hot on a bad angle produces the same fate.

An example, you come into a corner gravey lean angle is good centrifugal force doing its job ass end power-sliding the corner. Front tire riding its inner edge.. You hit a skip in the road, the back end hops. Its coming down with force. No fault of the rider and now you're up and over and your bikes coming after you.
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Old April 3rd, 2018, 06:20 AM   #25
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My old steel shoe says you can control a bike when the rear slides out. Power out. Chop the throttle and you are going for a YouTube worthy ride.
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Old April 3rd, 2018, 03:10 PM   #26
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My old steel shoe says you can control a bike when the rear slides out. Power out. Chop the throttle and you are going for a YouTube worthy ride.
ahhhaaha, like this!

Link to original page on YouTube.

Link to original page on YouTube.

Link to original page on YouTube.

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Old April 3rd, 2018, 04:01 PM   #27
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After looking at all those high-sides. It looks to me asphalt is a lot less forgiving then clay. Some are caused by a sudden throttle chop. Maybe they could have ridden it out. Others just happen so fast I don't believe anyone has the reaction to save it or convert it into a lowside.

I heard lots of talk at the American Flat Races that road racers are spending time in the dirt to improve their skills for the asphalt.
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Old April 3rd, 2018, 04:24 PM   #28
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Riding dirt definitely helped me keep my head when my rear started sliding. I knew what it was doing, and that I could ride it out for a bit.
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Old August 29th, 2019, 05:25 PM   #29
Hexadecimus
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adouglas View Post
Heard at the track this past weekend:

"A highside is just a lowside where you chop the throttle."

Discuss.

@csmith12 @Misti @Sirref

False. It just means you go over the bike. Several things can cause it which you can just Google, so I'm not sure what there is to discuss exactly.
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Old August 29th, 2019, 06:35 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by Hexadecimus View Post
I'm not sure what there is to discuss exactly.
I feel ya, but the question is in the art of reading between the lines.


aka, "Is a high side really the result of chopping the throttle when the rear/front slides out?"

Cut to the fact of the matter of this thread;
9 times out of ten, the answer is to do NOTHING and it works itself out, the other .98% of the time, the answer is give it more throttle (not less). The other .01% of the time, you where gunna crash either way, so it don't really matter.

The discuss part is why are these the most common options, when should you use what skill/option and what can you do to prevent the issue in the first place?
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Old August 30th, 2019, 08:41 PM   #31
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My highside wan't about throttle, but brakes. My rear was sliding, and I let go the rear brake when I should have kept up with it.

But I could see needing to give a sliding bike more throttle. Or do nothing.
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Old January 6th, 2022, 06:41 PM   #32
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All this experience in going super fast I Hope isn't on the streets !
99% of my riding is on the streets now and pushing it to the limit like that just isn't an option.... yes I have ridden like that on the street in the past
No I have never high sided.... I have low sided though due to pea gravel in a corner and going way too fast..... I have locked up the rear wheel on several occasions and had the ass try to pass the front but controled it by slipping the brake on the rear wheel....
don't get me wrong , going fast is really fun ! but it's also dangerous as hell
especially on the street .... take it to the track man !
you know going to town takes 30 minutes in a car but you can do it in 12 minutes on the bike and never cross the white line.... that takes skill and a bit of craziness, but if a deer hops out in front of you you could well be dead
what are you trying to prove ? are you just having fun, or trying to kill yourself? stop trying to go faster.... try to pick the perfect line instead !
and when you come around that blind corner and there is a truck on your side of the road you might survive.... if your going any faster you will not !
....
my 2 coppers !
Bob.........
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Old January 8th, 2022, 10:03 AM   #33
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Two kinds of low sides. 1. Trail braking into turn, losses the front. 2. Accelerate too early, low side from rear. This is usually whilst still cranked over. Stomping on rear brake or chopping throttle can lead the rear low side to grip & stand up into a high side or if you are lucky a run wide & recover.
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Old February 13th, 2022, 08:40 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CaliGrrl View Post
My highside wan't about throttle, but brakes. My rear was sliding, and I let go the rear brake when I should have kept up with it.

But I could see needing to give a sliding bike more throttle. Or do nothing.
That sounds like an accurate representation of what caused your high-side and I may be picking a bit much on semantics here but you say that when your rear was sliding you should have "kept up with it."

This might have ended better than the high-side but if you had just "kept up with it" and continued to let the rear slide, you might have ended up lowsiding instead.

What we teach at the Superbike School is to release the brake just enough so that it stops sliding (or being locked up) but that you continue to slow down. Keeping it locked and sliding or releasing the brakes too quickly can both have neg consequences while releasing the brakes slightly should rectify the situation.

Now, I'm not saying this is easy to do, especially for anyone that hasn't trained in that procedure just that it is something worth practicing and can be extremely helpful in emergency braking situations. I hope that made sense. What other techniques can help with emergency braking situations?
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Old February 14th, 2022, 12:33 PM   #35
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Yes, I could have ended up low-siding. I don't think I had (have?) the skills to save it. Maybe.

I have since locked up the rear a time or two in heavy braking situations, though the bike was upright, so I was able to keep it that way and am working to learn how hard I can use the brake without locking anything up.
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Old February 14th, 2022, 01:27 PM   #36
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Something you could do to help get that rear brake down pat... find a large parking lot late at night where there is no body around and do your practicing there.... but start off slow say 20 mph and see how much pressure it takes on the peddle to get the rear wheel to lock up remember that pressure and try to never go any harder than that..... I did that in my younger years and it has served me well through my riding courier. problems do occur when you change tires though ...every tire out there stops differently meaning you need to test each tire ! .... I got up to 50mph in doing my stoping practice and keeping the rear wheel still turning under extremely hard breaking it would leave short patches of black on the pavement not a continuous length and yes ...you do stop much much faster that way.....
I then started working on adding the front brake amd talk about stopping FAST then.... I really never used the front brake up till then.... but once I did I was keenly aware that I could stop 2 times faster than a car !
....
My New bike has ABS and I've yet to try and lock up the wheels on it
but that has to be the PANIC Stop Dream of the century !
.... for at least 30 years of my bike riding I set the front wheel's brake to not lock up when breaking hard ( old drum brake type) but when front disks came out I quit doing that. and found I could stop a good 10 to 15 foot shorter on those bikes ....
Seeing how fast you can stop has become a game to me and I love doing it
but it is hard on equipment ! LOL.... stopping in 30' at 60 mph to me is darn good ! i'm proud of that, but it took alot of practice to get there....
once you get it down you never loose it there is something about the pressure you feel in your foot and the deceleration that drives it home in memory.... it's not like cornering .... but be aware it takes less foot pressure to skid the rear in a hard turn.... I never really practiced that much so I just use about 3/4 of the normal pressure on the foot in the turns....
( i try to never brake in a turn but in a panic situation 3/4 is max)
.......
hope that helps.....
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Old February 14th, 2022, 09:41 PM   #37
Misti
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CaliGrrl View Post
Yes, I could have ended up low-siding. I don't think I had (have?) the skills to save it. Maybe.

I have since locked up the rear a time or two in heavy braking situations, though the bike was upright, so I was able to keep it that way and am working to learn how hard I can use the brake without locking anything up.
Great! Practice will help- like Bob suggested- good stuff what other things might help with emergency braking? Should you do anything special with your arms or lower body?
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Old February 15th, 2022, 01:12 AM   #38
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Quote:
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Great! Practice will help- like Bob suggested- good stuff what other things might help with emergency braking? Should you do anything special with your arms or lower body?
Immediately get into a position like you discovered a small tree across the road and you were going to go over it... elbows up, back straight, "full control posture" none of this slouching and use your body weight to keep the bike upright let the bike move under you.......cruising corners is not the same thing as going over obstacles.... you need balance
....
a while back I was on the Ninja going into a corner at a brisk pace and got there a bit too fast.... the classic going too fast for what I was ready for
I didn't have enough lean into the corner to make it and I knew it....
it prompted a quick grab on both brakes, to slow me down... but now I wasn't heading through the curve any more I was headed into the embankment on the right side instead ( applying the brakes will straighten the bike up) I had about 3' of pavement before the dirt on the right side
at that point I layed the bike over to the left in a sharp lean while my body was vertical .... and it gave me just enough cornering to keep the front and rear wheel about 3" from the dirt .... if I'd have hit the dirt I would have gone down and into the ditch ....I was probably only doing 35mph on a 20 mph corner.... but I was set up for the corner all wrong and I knew it....
switching to leaning the bike and not me saved my ass that time but only barely as there was no way to lean the bike any more ....my arms aren't that long !!! LOL... but my balance was fixed at that point.
i made it through that corner with my heart in my mouth and eyes wide open thinking "You know Old timer, your out'a practice!" so the rest of my ride was much slower and alot more enjoyable.....
.... but i DID NOT LOCK UP EITHER WHEEL but the bike slowed down so much that I could have actually stopped before going off the road I think...
the Ninja has real good brakes ! I think my problem stemmed from getting off the brakes too soon..... and I made a mental note of that more braking practice is needed for me as well......
....
Bob.........
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Old February 15th, 2022, 01:50 AM   #39
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seeing as I have 3 riding styles that I use all the time and not just one I think I should explain.... I'm not a Racer ! in fact I'm nowhere near as fast a rider as I used to be.... but I do love the feel of the bike under me in a corner
... Any bike can go fast fast is not the issue.... control is the issue ! and keeping control of the bike in every situation is something your life depends upon..... there are times when hanging off the bike on the left hand side in a left hand turn is perfect , and other times when leaning the bike and keeping your body straight and balanced is the better way. and then there's times when I am just sitting on the back of the bike enjoying the view....in cruising mode ( which is what you see most big road bikes using ,just on the back letting the bike yank them down the road)
....but there is a set of things I do when the unexpected happens....
eyes UP, back straight elbows out ,and balance in check..... some times the last one balance in check is not so easy especially, for a old man ! my balance is NOT what it used to be I couldn't ride a wheelie 10 feet yet alone 150ft any more.... in an emergency I revert to how the Highway patrol rides... keeping your balance in check and leaning the bike... that has never failed me and you can switch to that MODE in a heart-beat the bike does not care.....
so if you find yourself going into a corner too fast that is an option...
but not one to take lightly you need to ride like that quite a bit to get the feel of how it works..... if your not used to it, practice in a parking lot....
it will surprise you at how well it works.... and why the CHP use that method !...
....
almost everyone out there starts riding like that anyway so it becomes second nature when on a bike.... the hard part is learning the body hanging off style.... it's the same but the body position is all screwed up your still part of the bike in balance ...even more attuned to it , and if you miscalculate then , you really have your hands full.
......
You need and Old clunker 100cc bike you can drop and not really hurt....
an old beat to hell 100cc bike that looks like hell but has wheels and an engine and does actually ride.... that way you can learn more on a old beater bike in one afternoon than you can be taught in a month of weekends with an instructor !....... and it is FUN !

.....
Bob....
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Old March 7th, 2022, 08:22 AM   #40
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I would add too that squeezing the tank with your knees and remaining relaxed even under hard braking will help keep you and your bike under control. Using your legs to grip the tank helps keep you more relaxed because you stay connected and stable with your lower body. How might remaining relaxed help in an emergency braking situation?
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