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Old November 23rd, 2020, 02:50 PM   #1
Misti
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Riding Articles You Wish Someone Would Write About?!

Are there any riding topics relating to riding skills or techniques both on and off the track that you wish someone would write about? If you could ask a writer to write ANY riding related article, what would it be and why?

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Old November 23rd, 2020, 08:29 PM   #2
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I would want someone to write about ridding in the rain. Why? Even after riding motorcycles since I was a teenager ridding in the rain always makes me nervous especially when in a turn.
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Old November 23rd, 2020, 10:24 PM   #3
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i would like to see how riding styles and racing lines have evolved over the decades. due to technolgy in tires and equipment,
almost everything else has been beat to death .
i do like snakes idea , twice i been down at the track in the rain.
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Old November 25th, 2020, 02:44 PM   #4
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Meet and greet the "Monster" track girls would be great know all article.
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Old December 2nd, 2020, 03:28 AM   #5
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I like more concrete technique than abstract articles.

Topics I wish I had seen in articles in addition to discussions at the school:
1) Speed scrub awareness and avoiding the often unnoticed crutch of starting the throttle roll on too early and too slow to make up for a slow corner entry.
2) Timing and transitioning from a normal grip "on the brakes" to screwdriver hand to start the roll on mid-corner back to normal grip on the drive out of the corner.
3) Upper body positioning comparisons and use of reference points on the bike.
4) Vision tricks and tips.

Other topics:
5) Where to focus first to lower lap times at various levels of riding ability--e.g. getting to full throttle between corners, driving out of corners, corner speed, corner entry.
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Old January 6th, 2021, 12:15 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Snake View Post
I would want someone to write about ridding in the rain. Why? Even after riding motorcycles since I was a teenager ridding in the rain always makes me nervous especially when in a turn.

http://www.motomom.ca/riding-in-the-rain/.
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Old January 6th, 2021, 12:16 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by jrshooter View Post
i would like to see how riding styles and racing lines have evolved over the decades. due to technolgy in tires and equipment,
almost everything else has been beat to death .
i do like snakes idea , twice i been down at the track in the rain.
Good one.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CC Cowboy View Post
Meet and greet the "Monster" track girls would be great know all article.
Ha! I won't be writing that one, sorry
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Old January 6th, 2021, 12:20 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mechanikrazy View Post
I like more concrete technique than abstract articles.

Topics I wish I had seen in articles in addition to discussions at the school:
1) Speed scrub awareness and avoiding the often unnoticed crutch of starting the throttle roll on too early and too slow to make up for a slow corner entry.
2) Timing and transitioning from a normal grip "on the brakes" to screwdriver hand to start the roll on mid-corner back to normal grip on the drive out of the corner.
3) Upper body positioning comparisons and use of reference points on the bike.
4) Vision tricks and tips.

Other topics:
5) Where to focus first to lower lap times at various levels of riding ability--e.g. getting to full throttle between corners, driving out of corners, corner speed, corner entry.
Ohhhhhh, these are amazing!! The reason I ask is that I've been writing my own column in a magazine for the past 14 years and it's getting hard to come up with new article ideas and I'm curious to hear from others what they would like to read about. Even though I write for a few magazines, I rarely read them so it's nice to hear from enthusiasts what kind of articles they hope to see. I've done a lot on visuals but the other ones you suggested are great

I've just started writing a masterclass column for another motorcycle magazine as well so the more ideas I can get, the better! Thanks!

I love the last one, what would you think is a good starting point for lowering lap times?
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Old January 6th, 2021, 04:27 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Misti View Post
I've just started writing a masterclass column for another motorcycle magazine as well so the more ideas I can get, the better! Thanks!

I love the last one, what would you think is a good starting point for lowering lap times?
I think corner-entry is extremely important. Perhaps most important relative to other areas for improving lap-times.

Can you go over that?

- braking markers
- transition to corner-entry
- turn-in markers
- balancing braking with throttle
- trail-braking
- different types of apex
- entry vs. exit corners
- etc.

Thank you!
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Old January 6th, 2021, 06:42 PM   #10
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Great article @Misti! Thanks.
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Old January 7th, 2021, 02:57 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by DannoXYZ View Post
I think corner-entry is extremely important. Perhaps most important relative to other areas for improving lap-times.

Can you go over that?

- braking markers
- transition to corner-entry
- turn-in markers
- balancing braking with throttle
- trail-braking
- different types of apex
- entry vs. exit corners
- etc.

Thank you!
Corner entry IS extremely important, absolutely. You've listed a LOT of things here, each one a lengthy topic in and of itself. I can go over them for sure but probably not all at once.

Let's start with having markers for things like braking and turning in. We call them reference points or braking/turning in markers. Why do you want to have a marker in the first place? And what is a marker supposed to DO for you? Ideally for any given corner, how many markers should you have?

Let's start the discussion and I'll chime in and maybe even write an article about it down the line. Youve listed some great topics here.
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Old January 7th, 2021, 03:03 PM   #12
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Great article @Misti! Thanks.
YAY! Thanks
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Old January 7th, 2021, 05:30 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Misti View Post
Corner entry IS extremely important, absolutely. You've listed a LOT of things here, each one a lengthy topic in and of itself. I can go over them for sure but probably not all at once.

Let's start with having markers for things like braking and turning in. We call them reference points or braking/turning in markers. Why do you want to have a marker in the first place? And what is a marker supposed to DO for you? Ideally for any given corner, how many markers should you have?

Let's start the discussion and I'll chime in and maybe even write an article about it down the line. Youve listed some great topics here.
if you dont have a marker you have nothing to reference from.
you cant move a brake point forward/ backward without reference point to adjust from. you are riding by feel and feelings can lie to you.
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Old January 10th, 2021, 03:33 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Misti View Post
Ohhhhhh, these are amazing!! The reason I ask is that I've been writing my own column in a magazine for the past 14 years and it's getting hard to come up with new article ideas and I'm curious to hear from others what they would like to read about. Even though I write for a few magazines, I rarely read them so it's nice to hear from enthusiasts what kind of articles they hope to see. I've done a lot on visuals but the other ones you suggested are great

I've just started writing a masterclass column for another motorcycle magazine as well so the more ideas I can get, the better! Thanks!

I love the last one, what would you think is a good starting point for lowering lap times?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Misti View Post
Corner entry IS extremely important, absolutely. You've listed a LOT of things here, each one a lengthy topic in and of itself. I can go over them for sure but probably not all at once.

Let's start with having markers for things like braking and turning in. We call them reference points or braking/turning in markers. Why do you want to have a marker in the first place? And what is a marker supposed to DO for you? Ideally for any given corner, how many markers should you have?

Let's start the discussion and I'll chime in and maybe even write an article about it down the line. Youve listed some great topics here.

I am much more of a hands on learner than abstract, so the experimenting on the bike bit by bit is what helps me the most. Although the abstract topics are helpful, I have a hard time relaxing on the bike until I am confident in what I am doing physically. I mean that as when I know where my body should be, and when I should be doing what.

Regarding the good starting point for lowering lap times, I don't necessarily see it as a one-answer question. I think it depends on the rider and what their baseline is.

The "safe" answer for improving rider skills across the board: good visuals and reference points on corner entry.

My "real" answer on immediate lap time issues: throttle control on corner exit and trying to get to extend the 100% throttle duration between each corners. Trying to pick up a little extra bit on entry for the period from braking zone to apex gets risky for any given skill level, whereas the drive out and on-the-gas time from apex to the next corner's braking zone will cut more time on the straights.

Personally, at an intermediate pace, the latter was what helped me drop time quickly. Then when the plateau hit, focusing on visuals again to try and bump up entry speed helped me start chipping away again. And also, brought along some front end tucks.

I feel like one of these answer is going to get me a slap on the wrist though. Haha.
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Old January 15th, 2021, 03:34 PM   #15
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if you dont have a marker you have nothing to reference from.
you cant move a brake point forward/ backward without reference point to adjust from. you are riding by feel and feelings can lie to you.
Exactly. Having a marker gives you a starting point and helps LOCATE you on the road or track, if you don't know where you are or where you are going then you won't be as confident as if you did.

So you start with a brake marker and a marker for where you want to turn in.....then what? How do you transition from braking-turn point to suddenly cornering? What should you have done first (Before you start turning the bike?)

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Old January 15th, 2021, 09:08 PM   #16
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Exactly. Having a marker gives you a starting point and helps LOCATE you on the road or track, if you don't know where you are or where you are going then you won't be as confident as if you did.

So you start with a brake marker and a marker for where you want to turn in.....then what? How do you transition from braking-turn point to suddenly cornering? What should you have done first (Before you start turning the bike?)

i would say shifting eyes to next marker, i woud have hit the turn in with my peripheral vision.
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Old January 19th, 2021, 05:52 PM   #17
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i would say shifting eyes to next marker, i woud have hit the turn in with my peripheral vision.
Visually, yes absolutely. You want to shift your eyes to the next marker (while you are still going straight) but keeping the turn in point with your peripheral vision. Yes.

What about any physical actions on the bike? Should you set up your body position well before or at the same time you turn the bike? why?
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Old January 19th, 2021, 07:14 PM   #18
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Visually, yes absolutely. You want to shift your eyes to the next marker (while you are still going straight) but keeping the turn in point with your peripheral vision. Yes.

What about any physical actions on the bike? Should you set up your body position well before or at the same time you turn the bike? why?
i try to never sit center seat, if its a series of lefts i stay left on the bike.
i do center on the long straights and shift body before braking, sometimes tho i get caught shifting body while braking, not by plan but i think bieng lazy.
goal is to set up before braking to keep the bike setteled at turn in.
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Old January 20th, 2021, 08:32 PM   #19
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Thought I’d share this. I’ve found this article pretty informative and I’ve had it book marked for years now.
https://www.ridinginthezone.com/gues...g-cornerspeed/
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Old January 21st, 2021, 05:05 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by jrshooter View Post
i try to never sit center seat, if its a series of lefts i stay left on the bike.
i do center on the long straights and shift body before braking, sometimes tho i get caught shifting body while braking, not by plan but i think bieng lazy.
goal is to set up before braking to keep the bike setteled at turn in.
If I can, another advantage to setting up before braking is mental attention -- in addition to moving around potentially upsetting the bike it also just adds one more thing to do during what is already a busy moment (paying attention to how you're letting off brakes, visuals going from turn point to apex or other in-turn references and speed sense) and for a double bonus there's also a temptation to use the bars as a place to put weight while you move if done later, which could result in unintended inputs.
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Old January 25th, 2021, 02:47 PM   #21
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i try to never sit center seat, if its a series of lefts i stay left on the bike.
i do center on the long straights and shift body before braking, sometimes tho i get caught shifting body while braking, not by plan but i think bieng lazy.
goal is to set up before braking to keep the bike setteled at turn in.
Nice. Yes you don't need to sit in the centre of the seat (when track riding) so what you do sounds great! And as Yakarru points out, on top of helping to keep the bike more settled, setting up early can also give you added mental attention.

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If I can, another advantage to setting up before braking is mental attention -- in addition to moving around potentially upsetting the bike it also just adds one more thing to do during what is already a busy moment (paying attention to how you're letting off brakes, visuals going from turn point to apex or other in-turn references and speed sense) and for a double bonus there's also a temptation to use the bars as a place to put weight while you move if done later, which could result in unintended inputs.
Exactly . Are there ways that you can improve HOW you move across the bike as well?
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Old February 4th, 2021, 08:50 AM   #22
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Does riding different bikes at the track help or hurt? I like riding the 300 at some tracks, I think it helps me ride the 400 faster. Some tracks that arenít as technical, I prefer the bigger bikes. In 2020, I got too ride a 300, 400, 600 and 750 at different tracks. It was a fun season for sure. A friend of mines, who is an expert racer and waaaay faster than me said ďdoes riding all these different bikes mess with your headĒ? What say you Misti?
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Old February 8th, 2021, 02:39 PM   #23
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Does riding different bikes at the track help or hurt? I like riding the 300 at some tracks, I think it helps me ride the 400 faster. Some tracks that arenít as technical, I prefer the bigger bikes. In 2020, I got too ride a 300, 400, 600 and 750 at different tracks. It was a fun season for sure. A friend of mines, who is an expert racer and waaaay faster than me said ďdoes riding all these different bikes mess with your headĒ? What say you Misti?
I think it helps to ride different bikes for sure!!! Think about it like this; riding a variety of different bikes and different tracks gives you more overall experience- different perspectives etc. I LOVE riding different bikes, different disciplines (motocross, flat-track, sportbikes, cruisers, track days, racing, single track.....) if it has two wheels I want to ride it and so many of the skills translate.

For sure, some things can mess with your head, like if you are used to riding litre bikes with all the bling electronics, then switching to a smaller bike without such slick electronics can mess you up a bit. (I seriously forgot how to up and downshift manually once when I jumped on an old R6 after riding the Superbike School BMW S 1000's.) And some lines are going to be slightly different, like riding a litre bike tends to be a little more point and shoot than a smaller bike where corner speed is key to going fast. But, with experience on different bikes also comes the ability to switch back and forth easily- as you said, riding the 300 helps you ride the 400 better.

I think that riders that have experience on all different kinds of bikes tend to be faster and better riders overall than riders that stick to just one. It's similar to having SUPER FAST club racers that only ride on one or two tracks....they show up to race somewhere else believing that they are amazing racers because they win at their home track all the time- but find out that they actually suck compared to racers that have experience on many different tracks- they tend to be able to learn tracks much quicker.

So, that was the long answer....lol. The short answer is, ride them all!

What do you think are the key points or things to keep in mind when you are switching bikes? What things translate and what things don't?
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Old February 8th, 2021, 05:00 PM   #24
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I think it helps to ride different bikes for sure!!! Think about it like this; riding a variety of different bikes and different tracks gives you more overall experience- different perspectives etc. I LOVE riding different bikes, different disciplines (motocross, flat-track, sportbikes, cruisers, track days, racing, single track.....) if it has two wheels I want to ride it and so many of the skills translate.

For sure, some things can mess with your head, like if you are used to riding litre bikes with all the bling electronics, then switching to a smaller bike without such slick electronics can mess you up a bit. (I seriously forgot how to up and downshift manually once when I jumped on an old R6 after riding the Superbike School BMW S 1000's.) And some lines are going to be slightly different, like riding a litre bike tends to be a little more point and shoot than a smaller bike where corner speed is key to going fast. But, with experience on different bikes also comes the ability to switch back and forth easily- as you said, riding the 300 helps you ride the 400 better.

I think that riders that have experience on all different kinds of bikes tend to be faster and better riders overall than riders that stick to just one. It's similar to having SUPER FAST club racers that only ride on one or two tracks....they show up to race somewhere else believing that they are amazing racers because they win at their home track all the time- but find out that they actually suck compared to racers that have experience on many different tracks- they tend to be able to learn tracks much quicker.

So, that was the long answer....lol. The short answer is, ride them all!

What do you think are the key points or things to keep in mind when you are switching bikes? What things translate and what things don't?
I feel like I can write a BOOK on this topic! Well you did ask.......... one of the things I have to be mindful of when I go from the 300/400 to the 750 is the power! I almost lost the rear a few times coming out of a turn too hard on the throttle My 750 pulls crazy hard On the smaller bikes you can be much more aggressive on the throttle ALL THE TIME! AND you can brake much later in the turns, specially on the tracks that have a decent front straight. Thatís where the smaller bikes have the advantage and make them so much fun, is the late braking. You have to brake much sooner coming down from 150 as opposed to braking at 120 on a smaller bike. On the bigger bikes you can let off and reel in other bikes with the power. On the smaller bikes if you let off, you are DONE! Specially the 300, if you are not WOT you are losing ground. A fast small bike rider told me, ďeither you are on the brakes or you are on the gasĒ! Even though the 400 has around 15HP more than the 300 it feels like much more. I like riding the 300 for a few sessions then jump on the 400 and try to ride it WOT like the 300. The 600 is just different, you canít let up too much and itís harder too reel other bikes in with power. Riding the bigger bikes is definitely more tiring. I can ride the smaller bikes for a whole day at the track and not feel as tired or beat up like I do with the bigger bikes.
Looking forward to my season opener at NCBIKE, end of March. I will be taking the 400 and the 300.
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Old February 8th, 2021, 09:50 PM   #25
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I feel like I can write a BOOK on this topic! Well you did ask.......... one of the things I have to be mindful of when I go from the 300/400 to the 750 is the power! I almost lost the rear a few times coming out of a turn too hard on the throttle My 750 pulls crazy hard On the smaller bikes you can be much more aggressive on the throttle ALL THE TIME! AND you can brake much later in the turns, specially on the tracks that have a decent front straight. Thatís where the smaller bikes have the advantage and make them so much fun, is the late braking. You have to brake much sooner coming down from 150 as opposed to braking at 120 on a smaller bike. On the bigger bikes you can let off and reel in other bikes with the power. On the smaller bikes if you let off, you are DONE! Specially the 300, if you are not WOT you are losing ground. A fast small bike rider told me, ďeither you are on the brakes or you are on the gasĒ! Even though the 400 has around 15HP more than the 300 it feels like much more. I like riding the 300 for a few sessions then jump on the 400 and try to ride it WOT like the 300. The 600 is just different, you canít let up too much and itís harder too reel other bikes in with power. Riding the bigger bikes is definitely more tiring. I can ride the smaller bikes for a whole day at the track and not feel as tired or beat up like I do with the bigger bikes.
Looking forward to my season opener at NCBIKE, end of March. I will be taking the 400 and the 300.
i think you make a mistake . if everybody is on a 300/600/750 or a 1000
you back off, your not reeling them back in. you might use power on a less experienced rider who has a bad line and cant hit the exit. power does not make up for a bad exit when everybody else has the same power and uses it properly. i guess what im saying in short no matter what size bike, be on the brake or on the gas. you cant win while coasting.
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Old February 9th, 2021, 09:29 AM   #26
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i think you make a mistake . if everybody is on a 300/600/750 or a 1000
you back off, your not reeling them back in. you might use power on a less experienced rider who has a bad line and cant hit the exit. power does not make up for a bad exit when everybody else has the same power and uses it properly. i guess what im saying in short no matter what size bike, be on the brake or on the gas. you cant win while coasting.
I agree 100%. Riding a small bike makes you a better rider! You are not relying on the power, you are using more SKILL. You canít make up for a mistake with power. Your line has too be better and you are on the throttle more and brake much later. Itís so rewarding to set up a pass while riding on a little bike and execute. You canít hesitate, you study long, you study wrong!
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Old February 9th, 2021, 10:46 PM   #27
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(I seriously forgot how to up and downshift manually once when I jumped on an old R6 after riding the Superbike School BMW S 1000's.)
I recently did CSS on my Ninjette and was given a huge finger wag to not use the clutch for my shifts -- learning that skill was definitely interesting but now it's pretty fun.

I will say that the thing I found hardest was the lack of a gear indicator -- when you're coming up on the top of the Ridge Complex and need to do multiple quick downshifts there's nothing more distracting than being one gear lower than you thought and ending up in surprise 1st! And since sometimes I manage an upshift going into 11 and sometimes I don't, depending on track conditions, I have to pay more attention than I'd like to keep that mental count straight.
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Old February 10th, 2021, 08:15 AM   #28
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I recently did CSS on my Ninjette and was given a huge finger wag to not use the clutch for my shifts -- learning that skill was definitely interesting but now it's pretty fun.

I will say that the thing I found hardest was the lack of a gear indicator -- when you're coming up on the top of the Ridge Complex and need to do multiple quick downshifts there's nothing more distracting than being one gear lower than you thought and ending up in surprise 1st! And since sometimes I manage an upshift going into 11 and sometimes I don't, depending on track conditions, I have to pay more attention than I'd like to keep that mental count straight.

Yes I agree 100%, after riding years on the track with a gear indicator, riding without one is quite a chore. I put the Healtech gear indicator in and I love it on my 300! It was a very simple install. I have GP SHIFT and it works like a charm. You are using more gears on a small bike so having a gear indicator is a big help!
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Old March 14th, 2021, 08:01 AM   #29
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I recently did CSS on my Ninjette and was given a huge finger wag to not use the clutch for my shifts -- learning that skill was definitely interesting but now it's pretty fun.

I will say that the thing I found hardest was the lack of a gear indicator -- when you're coming up on the top of the Ridge Complex and need to do multiple quick downshifts there's nothing more distracting than being one gear lower than you thought and ending up in surprise 1st! And since sometimes I manage an upshift going into 11 and sometimes I don't, depending on track conditions, I have to pay more attention than I'd like to keep that mental count straight.
Finger wag Ha!
And gear indicators- I. rarely look at mine I think (I'll have to pay more attention!) But normally I'm focused on what my students are doing and not what I'm doing- I seem to go more by the mental count in my head I think. Down down up up up up down down up. Ha!

Missing riding! It's been over a year for me, the longest I've ever gone- hope I don't lose all my riding skills! Lol.
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Old March 14th, 2021, 10:12 AM   #30
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Finger wag Ha!
And gear indicators- I. rarely look at mine I think (I'll have to pay more attention!) But normally I'm focused on what my students are doing and not what I'm doing- I seem to go more by the mental count in my head I think. Down down up up up up down down up. Ha!

Missing riding! It's been over a year for me, the longest I've ever gone- hope I don't lose all my riding skills! Lol.
i never know what gear im in.
i do know down 2 for this corner, up 1, than down 1 for next corner. as a example.
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Old March 14th, 2021, 10:38 PM   #31
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Finger wag Ha!
And gear indicators- I. rarely look at mine I think (I'll have to pay more attention!) But normally I'm focused on what my students are doing and not what I'm doing- I seem to go more by the mental count in my head I think. Down down up up up up down down up. Ha!

Missing riding! It's been over a year for me, the longest I've ever gone- hope I don't lose all my riding skills! Lol.
Yeah, 99% of the time I can go by just the rpms/power band and donít care numerically; but first gear on the ninjette is so wound up that itís borderline useless outside starting and so ending up in it by mistake burns. On my s1000 itís way less of an issue (power bands are wider and first has a usable, if tight, range). Pretty much the only place it occurs though is those rapid multiple shift corners like 13 though.
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Old March 16th, 2021, 08:15 PM   #32
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misti
how about, how tecnology has affected lap times over the decades.
i think woud be a interesting read. it seams every year theres new this or new that, but lap records can stand for many years.
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Old March 28th, 2021, 09:56 AM   #33
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misti
how about, how tecnology has affected lap times over the decades.
i think woud be a interesting read. it seams every year theres new this or new that, but lap records can stand for many years.
That's an excellent idea! What are your thoughts on why lap records can stand for many years despite the fact that technology is always evolving?
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Old April 7th, 2021, 03:44 AM   #34
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That's an excellent idea! What are your thoughts on why lap records can stand for many years despite the fact that technology is always evolving?
I can think of a few reasons:

1. track conditions. Often records are broken shortly after a track is resurfaced or similarly treated. On the other hand, as a track ages the available traction, viable lines, etc. all become less compliant and make record setting laps harder.

2. physical limits. For example: as amazing as modern brakes are we're still on Earth, which means applied braking forces are limited by the raw physics of Newton. Bikes can't add downforce as effectively as F1 vehicles and such, which means that braking can't go much past 1G. Top level, record setting riders are generally pushing these physical limits, not bike technology limits.

3. related to the previous, technology tends to help riders but it can't replace them. No matter how good your traction control if a rider adds throttle and lean they're going to risk having a bad day. Top level riders have usually been riding many years and so in some cases the gains are more limited (autoblippers on downshifts are great, but those riders have hit the point where they aren't losing much to do it by hand) and in other cases requires adaptation and tuning to find what allows the technology to be brought effectively to use at a record pace level.

4. weakest link issues. Related to the previous topics, lap record pace riders generally have figured out how to get the most out of their machines and as such can end up in a weakest link situation. If you get a new tire compound it may give some benefit but if the limiting factor is coming from the suspension or engine power curve then it just gives "wiggle room" and doesn't raise the ceiling on the top pace.

and a bonus for fun:
5. "weird" physical issues. For example: https://interestingengineering.com/s...s-in-swimming/ -- things like heat expansion can actually change factors like the physical length of the track. While I doubt this comes into play very often or very much it is one of those things that does happen and could contribute.
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